Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day—May 15, 2013

After an extended period of cool and rainy weather, the end of spring appears to be in sight. The 10-day forecast for the Upstate shows high temperatures between 80 to 87 degrees F and only an occasional chance for an afternoon thunderstorm.

In my garden, where shade dominates, winter and spring are the primary seasons for blooms. Even still, there are a handful of flowers worth sharing now.

'Summer Beauty', a hybrid of Acanthus mollis and Acanthus spinosus.

‘Summer Beauty’, a hybrid of Acanthus mollis and Acanthus spinosus.

Chief among these is Acanthus ‘Summer Beauty’. This hybrid plant was chosen for a feature spot near the front door, where its attractive foliage adds year-round interest. Bloom spikes, which began to appear about 6 weeks ago, now stand 5-feet tall. Along each stalk, white blooms peek from under a purple hood (calyx).

Blooms of Summer Beauty peek from under hoods.

Blooms of Summer Beauty peek from under hoods.

Other flowers in the ornamental garden (which circles the house) include a native wisteria ‘Amethyst Falls’ (W. frutescens) and columbine ‘Crystal Star’ (Aquilegia caerulea). A number of hydrangeas are also beginning to show their stuff, including this bigleaf hydrangea (H. macrophylla).

'Amethyst Falls'

‘Amethyst Falls’

'Crystal Star' is a vigorous performer with long spurs.  (Note: the foliage in this photo is iris.)

‘Crystal Star’ is a vigorous performer with long spurs. (Note: the foliage in this photo is iris.)

Hydrangea macrophylla

Hydrangea macrophylla

In the woodland garden, eye-catching Rhododendron is in its glory, but it is the shy Jack-in-the-Pulpit (Arisaema triphyllum) that is the superstar.

Rhododendron

Rhododendron

Jack-in-the-Pulpit (Arisaema triphyllum)

Jack-in-the-Pulpit (Arisaema triphyllum)

To see what’s blooming in the rest of the world visit the host of Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day—Carol at May Dreams Gardens.

11 thoughts on “Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day—May 15, 2013

  1. Susan Temple

    I’m envious of the Bear’s Breeches. Mine, after about 8 years, has never bloomed. But I’m not giving up!

    >>> Hortitopia 5/15/2013 2:06 PM >>>
    Marian St.Clair posted: “After an extended period of cool and rainy weather, the end of spring appears to be in sight. The 10-day forecast for the Upstate shows high temperatures between 80 to 87 degrees F and only an occasional chance for an afternoon thunderstorm. In my gar”

    Reply
    1. Marian St.Clair Post author

      Susan–Is yours a Summer Beauty? I hear the A. mollis is much harder to grow. Mine gets about 2 hours of light in the middle of the day as the sun crosses over the house. It likes lots of moisture and will wilt in summer if not well watered.

      Reply
  2. Lisa at Greenbow

    I have tried bears breeches several times but haven’t found a spot where it will survive. Yours is gorgeous. Happy GBBD.

    Reply
  3. Marian St.Clair Post author

    PBM–one of the best things about this plant is that no one is quite sure what it is. I’m not a plant collector (my primary interest is design), but I think after a certain point in a gardener’s development they should have a few “special” plants that push the garden up a notch.

    Reply
  4. Helene

    Hello, I found you through GBBD, what a lovely garden you have :-)
    I also have an Acanthus, mine is Acanthus spinosus and last year it had 13 spikes of various sizes! I think I need to split it soon, it is getting too big for its spot. I also grow arisaema, Arisaema amurense. I have a 60/40 shade/sun garden so a lot of my plants are for shade and semi shade. Take care, Helene.

    Reply

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