Restoring Nature

Nature has always restored my soul and lightened my load, so shouldn’t I return the favor?

This photograph and its story of my husband and me cleaning the Reedy River behind our home, published in The Greenville News in September 2012, engendered more response from readers than any other work last year.

Tires, including some whitewalls from the 1940's, removed from the Reedy River in September 2012.

Tires, including some whitewalls from the 1940’s, removed from the Reedy River in September 2012.

In addition to the obvious, here are just a few reasons (photographed January 5, 2013) we continue the mammoth effort to clean the river and remove invasive plants such as English ivy from the woodland.

Cranfly orchid (Tipularia discolor)

Cranfly orchid (Tipularia discolor)

Christmas fern (Polystichum acrostichoides)

Christmas fern (Polystichum acrostichoides)

Arrowleaf ginger (Hexastylis arifolia)

Arrowleaf ginger (Hexastylis arifolia)

Silverleaf hydrangea (Hydrangea radiata)

Silverleaf hydrangea (Hydrangea radiata)

Animal slide between bank and river.

Animal slide between bank and river

Raccon tracks

Raccoon tracks

Probable river otter tracks

Probable river otter tracks

“If the sight of the blue skies fills you with joy, if a blade of grass springing up in the fields has power to move you, if the simple things of nature have a message that you understand, rejoice, for your soul is alive.” ~Eleonora Duse

10 thoughts on “Restoring Nature

  1. Jan Weakland

    Thanks for sharing your photos! If anyone is interested in helping restore spots or fight invasives, they can contact the SC Native Plant Society (see http://www.scnps.org) as they do field work several times a year. Last year, I participated in a morning along the Reedy and met some wonderful people while pulling up ivy and appreciating the natural setting.

    Reply
  2. Susan Temple

    I uncovered a very large stand of bloodroot under honeysuckle when I first bought my land. But yesterday, saw English Ivy heading up a tree by the creek. Yikes!! Didn’t notice it in the summer. Killing that just went to the top of the to do list.

    >>> Hortitopia 1/7/2013 1:16 PM >>>
    marianstclair posted: “Nature has always has always restored my soul and lightened my load, so shouldn’t I return the favor? This photograph and its story of my husband and I cleaning the Reedy River behind our home, published in The Greenville News in September 2012, eng”

    Reply
  3. Debra Strange

    Keep the faith! I do have one area that less of the ivy comes back every year! When we started clearing dead trees, editing unnecessary trees and privet plus honeysuckle, neat stuff started coming up and rewarding my efforts. Some of them the same as yours. It takes time, but SO worth it!

    Reply
    1. marianstclair Post author

      I agree! As we’ve removed the ivy we’ve had ferns pop up within a few months time. Experts tell me the wildflowers are still there too and will be back in evidence when the sunlight can reach the soil.

      Reply
  4. Janet, The Queen of Seaford

    We live on the Saluda (upper end of Lake Greenwood) and have some tires along our shoreline. Each winter when the lake level is down we remove them. Think the catfish lovers put them in for small habitats.
    Love that you have Cranefly orchids, I do too! I wish I had Christmas ferns. The only ferny plants I have found so far is Ebony Spleenwort. Great finds in your landscape!

    Reply
  5. Eliza @ Appalachian Feet

    Love this! I can see why it got so many responses. I’m also very happy that English ivy seems to be falling further and further out of favor. It’s so sad to walk into a wild place and find that all the native flowers are hiding under a blanket of it (or morel mushrooms…).

    Reply
    1. Marian St.Clair Post author

      I can’t wait to see if what happens (if anything) this spring. I’ve been told the wildflowers will return very quickly; the roots and rhizomes are still there in the soil, they just need the sun to get going again. We didn’t get started on the ivy until after the spring flowers last year…even still we had two patches of native ferns pop up in summer.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s