Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day—January 15, 2013

Today is my first post for Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day and I’m excited to join a group of plant enthusiasts who share the excitement of what’s flowering in their gardens on the 15th day of each month.

After a cold start to 2013 in the Upstate, with nights dropping into the 20s, January has flip-flopped to provide a week of spring-like conditions with lots of rain and daytime temperatures reaching into the 60s and even 70s. The recent unseasonable weather, coupled with a milder-than-usual winter, has provoked many plants into early bloom.

I find the camellias, which predate me in this garden, to be especially cheerful this year. I’m only sorry I can’t provide their names.

Camellia japonica

Camellia japonica

Camellia japonica

Camellia japonica

Camellia japonica

Camellia japonica

Camellia japonica

Camellia japonica

Camellia sasanqua

Camellia sasanqua

The garden is sweetly scented thanks to this trio of fragrant woody plants.

Hamamelis mollis 'Wisley Supreme'

Hamamelis mollis ‘Wisley Supreme’

Prunus mume 'Peggy Clark'

Prunus mume ‘Peggy Clark’

Osmanthus fragrans

Osmanthus fragrans

And wouldn’t winter be lackluster without these seasonal favorites?

Helleborus orientalis

Helleborus orientalis

Helleborus niger 'Jacob'

Helleborus niger ‘Jacob’

Viola 'Sorbet Antique Shades'

Viola ‘Sorbet Antique Shades’

Mixed container including ornamental kale and pansy 'Dynamite Wine Flash'

Mixed container including ornamental kale and pansy ‘Dynamite Wine Flash’

If you’d like to see what’s flowering today in other gardens, visit the site where Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day began—May Dreams Gardens.

24 thoughts on “Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day—January 15, 2013

  1. indygardener

    Wow, that beats my Midwestern garden. We can’t grow camellias at all, but oh the temptation to try. Thanks for joining in. It’s a pleasure to have you join us!

    Reply
  2. Elaine

    Absolutely beautiful gardens and I am sure they are all given careful, loving care. Thank you for sharing the pictures and blog. Though our time in Florida is brief we enjoy its beauty and look forward to the spring blooms in upstate New York upon our trip home in March.

    Reply
  3. beth jimenez

    Weren’t you lucky to inherit some real beauties! And yes,we are lucky to live in a climate where we have lots of beautiful blooms throughout the winter if we chose.Hellebores,Edgeworthias,camelias and so much more.Thanks for a lovely trip through your winter garden and I look forward to MORE.
    Beth

    Reply
  4. beth jimenez

    Marian
    Don’t forget to add Camelia Forest to your list of ‘must visit’ when you come to Raleigh.David Park has amazing plants.

    Reply
  5. John Elsley

    Hi Marion, Much enjoying your Blogs – keep up the good work! I have really come to appreciate over the last 10 years or so the outstandind value of Camellias as ornamental shrubs for our local gardens. I have greatly expanded my selection in recent years with the help and advice of the folks at Camellia Forest Nursery in Chapel Hill N.C. – a magnificent “local” resource not only Camellias but other more unusual trees and shrubs including, as you mentioned recently a wide range of early flowering Japanese Apricot (Prunus mume) cultivars. When we moved into our garden 32 years ago, like yourself, we inherited a number of well established unnamed Camellias. Over the years I have, with the help of various individuals and publications attempted to identify them with some success I feel! Looking at the ones featured in your January15th Blog, the following are suggestions of possible identifications in the order you showed them. 1. Camellia japonica ‘Glen 40’ A formal double from the 1850’s and registered in 1942 in the U.S. under this name. I have this in my garden. 2. Camellia japonica ‘Hikarugenji’ An informal double introduced from Japan in 1859 and later listed as ‘Jorden’s Pride’ in the U.S. 3. Camellia japonica ‘Pink Perfection’ A formal double brought to the U.S. in 1875 – in Japan it is called ‘Otome’. Very popular and I enjoy it here in Greenwood! 4. Camellia japonica ‘Memphis Bell’ A semi – double introduced by Wilkes Nursery, Moultrie, Ga. in 1968. 5. Sorry, no good suggestion for the Cammellia sasanqua! As I am sure you know, the naming of older Camellias is not an exact science! The same plant usually has acquired several names over the years. As far as I can determine, the only more modern illustrated book on Camellias is ‘The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Camellias’ by an Australian author Stirling Macoboy, published by Timber Press in the late 1990’s. – a valuable publication but one that is of limited use when a reference is needed for modern varieties, especially American introductions. Such a publication would be invaluable to American gardeners, and would probably be best compiled by a group of Camellia lovers! Good photographs would be essential!! Cheers, John.

    Sent from my iPad

    Reply
    1. Marian St.Clair Post author

      As ususal, John, you astound me. Many thanks for your identification of the camellias. And I wholeheartedly agree about Camellia Forest Nursery in Chapel Hill, N.C., They are a tremendous resouce for not only camellias but other more unusual trees and shrubs. I’m ready for a shopping trip!

      Reply

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