Feeder Frenzy

Last night’s temperature dropped into the low 20’s, creating a dawn frenzy at the bird feeders. It’s always difficult to get a good photograph, since the birds move quickly and the telephoto lens exaggerates movement, but patience paid off this morning. Take a look at who’s coming to breakfast:

Eastern Bluebird--I've heard that this species doesn't eat at feeders, but I've had a visiting pair on several occasions in the past weeks.

Eastern Bluebird–I’ve heard that this species doesn’t eat at feeders, but I’ve had a visiting pair on several occasions in the past weeks.


Everyone loves the Northern Cardinal and I'm no exception.  Here's the colorful male...

Everyone loves the Northern Cardinal and I’m no exception. Here’s the colorful male…


and his buffy-brown mate.

and his buffy-brown mate.


The Tufted Titmouse who whistles "peter-peter-peter."

The Tufted Titmouse who whistles “peter-peter-peter.”


The Carolina Chickadee, who unlike the Black-Capped, has no white in its wings.

The Carolina Chickadee, who unlike the Black-Capped, has no white in its wings.


The Ruby-crowned Kinglet, a winter migrant visiting from the frigid north.

The Ruby-crowned Kinglet, a winter migrant visiting from the frigid north.

The small Downy Woodpecker, using his tail for balance.

The small Downy Woodpecker, using his tail for balance.


And the glorious Red-Bellied Woodpecker, with his zebra back and scarlet cap.

And the glorious Red-Bellied Woodpecker, with his zebra back and scarlet cap.


Have you seen any surprising birds at your feeders lately?

21 thoughts on “Feeder Frenzy

  1. Martha Robinson

    Glorious photos. I have seen more Bluebirds this past month than are normall here.. Six at one time one day last week. Gaston County, NC

    Reply
  2. pbmgarden

    Great pictures Marian. We’ve had lots of bluebirds at the feeders, although I too have heard they don’t use them. Now you have me wondering if our chickadees are Carolina or Black-Capped. I’m not very good at identifying birds but will check the wing color. Stay warm. Susie

    Reply
  3. Gloria Ballard

    Beautiful photos! I love the quizzical look of the tufted titmouse, and that’s a gorgeous Eastern bluebird! We don’t have bluebirds, and I haven’t seen goldfinches in our garden in a couple of months, but the others come to our feeders. Sometimes a nuthatch will visit, too, and we have lots of Carolina wrens and house finches. Mourning doves and juncos come to peck at the leavings on the ground under the feeders.

    Reply
  4. ginnytalbert

    What a delightful group of splendid bird shots, Marian! I have some juncos (snow birds) today and a couple of crows managed to knock my suet feeder to to ground so they could feast on my home made suet (filled w/peanut hearts, cracked corn, & raw sunflower seeds). Otherwise I’m seeing the same feeder birds you are, and such a pleasure they are! Single digits here this morn…

    Reply
  5. Evelyn JW

    Using your suet recipe,(the only kind my birds will eat), I had 5 bluebirds trying to get on the woodpecker suet cage at once. The cardinals get on it too. I think the bird you referred to as a goldfinch is actually a Ruby-crowned Kinglet, note the white eye ring and the pronounced wing bars. However, it would be rare to see the ruby crown.

    Reply
  6. Anne Woods

    Hi Marian, I don’t have bird feeders anymore with 3 cats lurking around. Growing up in Charlottesville, VA, we would have flocks of Evening Grosbeaks. Oh my, but they were gorgeous. Lots of yellow like the American Goldfinch but the size of a Cardinal. Probably the prettiest bird I’ve ever had in my yard over the years was an Indigo Bunting. The blue plumage was strikingly beautiful, even more intense than the bluebird. Thanks again for having us over for “Wine & Collards”. Great fun!

    Sent from Anne Woods’ iPhone

    >

    Reply
  7. Pauline

    What wonderful colourful birds you have, so different from ours. We too have a family of woodpeckers that come to our feeders, they are drumming on the trees at the moment, someone should tell them spring is a long way away.

    Reply
  8. Barbara Wilder

    The operative word at our feeders is frenzy! Birds stage themselves in the redbud tree waiting their turn to access 2 different feeders. Most of the time they act like 2 year olds who haven’t quite mastered the art of sharing. Biggest herald of penetrating cold is the arrival of 6 hooded merganzers to the pond behind our home. Last year’s journal entry shows the merganzers arriving in late Jan but this year I saw them on Dec 29 which is the earliest arrival date since we’ve been in SC.
    I think we’re heading for temps below zone 8a tonight! Sure hope my Daphne buds hold on.

    Reply
  9. Jason

    Great bird pictures! I love the bluebird. I have seen kinglets feeding in the shrubbery but they have never come to our feeders. I would say at this point we haven’t seen any unusual visitors, though the northern flickers only show up occasionally.

    Reply

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