My Garden this Weekend–April 6, 2014

I’ve had two days in the garden in the past week and things are showing enough improvement to give an update. On Wednesday I transplanted roughly 3 dozen Sweet Betsy trilliums from the development site off Pleasantburg Drive (about a city block from my back garden through the woods). I also finally emptied the last plants from the holding area. Nearly all went in the woodland, with those needing the most sun being planted closest to the river or in little pockets of light, here and there.

Saturday was devine, with temps in the 70s and plenty of sun. Tim helped me move another dozen or so trilliums plus a few Christmas ferns and then I marked all the native plants (130+) in the woodland with new orange flags. Marking the plants is important, at least for now, so I don’t loose track of them when they’re dormant. Finally, I worked on pulling the little bits of ivy that show up in spring and other small tasks that always pile up but seldom get done.

Woodland garden with flags marking native plants.

Woodland garden with flags marking native plants.

Carolina silverbell (Halesia tetraptera)

Carolina silverbell (Halesia tetraptera)

The Carolina silverbell are in full flower, with their white hoop skirt-like blooms hanging in clusters below the braches. I counted roughly a dozen types of pollinators, mostly bees, among the blooms.

Bumble bee among the blooms of Carolina silverbell.

Bumble bee among the blooms of Carolina silverbell.

The second most exciting thing to happen in the woodland is the emergence of the mayapples. You can tell right from the get-go if the plant will have a bloom or not, as the shoot comes up with the flower bud at its tip.

Mayapple shoots, one with flower bud and one without.

Mayapple shoots, one with flower bud and one without.

Mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum)

Mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum)

In just a few days the leaves take on their umbrella shape and begin to rise above the bloom. In time, the flowers produce a fleshy, egg-shaped fruit that is edible when ripe, but all other parts of the mayapple are highly poisonous to humans and most other animals.

Flower buds on the sweet shrubs are roughly the size of an English pea. The honey-scented blooms of Fothergilla are beginning to form, and just above the retaining wall, the serviceberry are flowering. Best of all, I caught sight of a giant turtle in the river.

Sweet shrub (Calycanthus floridus)

Sweet shrub (Calycanthus floridus)

Fothergilla major

Fothergilla major

Serviceberry (Amelanchier x grandiflora)

Serviceberry (Amelanchier x grandiflora)

Turtle!

Turtle!

And here are a few signs of spring in the front garden.

White dogwood (Cornus florida) and azaleas.

White dogwood (Cornus florida) and azaleas.

Fullmoon Japanese maple (Acer japonicum)

Fullmoon Japanese maple (Acer japonicum)

Blue starflower (Ipheion uniflorum)

Blue starflower (Ipheion uniflorum)

Pink dogwood (Cornus florida rubra)

Pink dogwood (Cornus florida rubra)

15 thoughts on “My Garden this Weekend–April 6, 2014

  1. Cathy

    Lots of lovely plants I don’ recognize here! It’s great to see what people grow on the other side of the Atlantic! I really like the silverbells shrub, and the maaple flowers are beautiful too. 😀

    Reply
  2. Gloria Ballard

    So many beautiful things in full bloom or budding or showing the promise of budding soon. Such a wonderful time of year.

    Reply
  3. Pauline

    Three dozen Trilliums, how wonderful to rescue them. I am hoping to get one or two in the woodland here but they are so expensive! All the flowers and new growth on your trees show that spring has certainly arrived with you.

    Reply
    1. Marian St.Clair Post author

      Pauline–Since the ivy was removed two winters ago, more natives return each year. I discovered a wild ginger (Hexastylis arifolia) for the first time this past weekend. And I have new trilliums that seeded last year! Do your trillium’s ever come from seed?

      Reply
  4. Sharon Lanier

    Your photos and comments always make me smile!! I love the Carolina Silverbell especially…rarely see it in anyone’s garden. Just lovely! 130 items in your woodland garden is terrific. So glad you could rescue so many of them. See you soon!

    Reply
  5. pbmgarden

    Wonderful to see all your spring treasures Marian. Love the Sweet shrub–reminds me of a special gardener from years ago. And your Dogwood and azaleas mean truly signal spring to me.
    By the way, thanks for the ID of the bridal wreath spiraea. I’d forgotten.

    Reply
  6. Marie Barr

    Love your columns! Paid special attention to what you plant. I hope you will address sweet shrub varieties. I love it! I remember wonderful aromas from my childhood! I transplanted a plant from my parents’ home, but there is almost no fragrance to my plants, which are doing well. I transplanted them about 10 years ago. Thanks.

    Reply

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