My Town

Apologies for my absence; it’s been impossible to keep up with my usual routine in the last weeks and the garden, as well as this blog, has suffered. But yesterday, Mother’s Day, was declared “all fun and no work” as Tim and I set aside time to relish Artisphere, Greenville’s annual festival for the visual artists.

Pedestrian bridge over the falls at Greenville's Fall Park.

Pedestrian bridge over the falls at Greenville’s Fall Park.

After enjoying breakfast at Mary Beth’s (an omelet for Tim and lemon ricotta pancakes for me), we headed for downtown across the Liberty Bridge at Falls Park. The bridge crosses the Reedy River—the same waterway that flows along the rear of our property—and is just two miles upstream from our home.

The unique bridge is a major attraction in the Upstate.

The unique bridge is a major attraction in the Upstate.

The bridge’s concrete reinforced deck (345 feet long, 12 feet wide and 8 inches thick) is supported by a single suspension cable. It’s distinctive curve has a radius of 214 feet and is cantilevered toward the waterfall from supporting cables on the outside. The deck also inclines 12 feet (3 percent) from east to west over the river.

The main falls of the Reedy River in downtown Greenville.

The main falls of the Reedy River in downtown Greenville.

It was here, near the falls, that Greenville’s first European settler, Richard Pearis, established his trading post in 1768. Pearis later built grist and saw mills and the location continued as the area’s epicenter of industry until the 1920s. Although you wouldn’t know it now, Greenville was once touted as the “Textile Center of the South,” with three mills operating on the river.

Falls Park was established in 1967 when 26 acres were reclaimed from development for restoration and preservation, but the park came into its own with the completion of the pedestrian bridge in 2004. Today, Falls Park hosts many public events and is regarded as a feature attraction of the Upstate.

Bowater Amphitheater, just west of the pedestrian bridge.

Bowater Amphitheater, just west of the pedestrian bridge.

Yesterday’s brilliant blue skies and warm temperatures brought out the crowd for Artisphere’s 10th annual event. In addition to painters, photographers, and sculptors, the festival also features digital, mixed media, wood, metal, fiber, glass, jewelry, and performance artists. And, of course, an array of food vendors add to the excitement.

Main Street Greenville, looking north.

Main Street Greenville, looking north.

Tim and I enjoyed strolling the booths and chatting with a few local artists including Joseph Bradley. It wasn’t long, however, before we claimed an empty bench to watch the spectacle.

A favorite local artist, Joseph Bradley.

A favorite local artist, Joseph Bradley.

Bradley's art, inspired by flora and fauna, is a study in balance, movement, and rhythm.

Bradley’s art, inspired by flora and fauna, is a study in balance, movement, and rhythm.

Of special interest was the commemorative sculpture, Ten Artispheres, recently added to downtown. Located just west of the Main Street bridge, near High Cotton, the piece was presented to the city by TD Bank. Artist John Acorn’s contemporary design was inspired by a sweetgum ball, the prickly fruit of Liquidumbar styraciflua.

On the west side of Main Street bridge, with "Ten Artispheres" to the left and the Peace Center on the far side of the river.

On the west side of Main Street bridge, with “Ten Artispheres” to the left and the Peace Center on the far side of the river.

Acorn, who chaired the Art Department at Clemson University for 21 years before retiring in 1997, is an active arts advocate in the Upstate and his work can be found in public and private collections across the Southeast.

"Ten Artispheres" seen from Riverwalk, above a bank of Virginia sweetspire (Itea virginica) and other ornamentals.

“Ten Artispheres” seen from Riverwalk, above a bank of Virginia sweetspire (Itea virginica) and other ornamentals.

Here are a few more photos of the day…exemplifying the spirit of life that makes our town special.

Sidewalk chalk art on Riverwalk.

Sidewalk chalk art on Riverwalk.

The children's fountain at River Place.

The children’s fountain at River Place.

Fun under Liberty Bridge.

Fun under Liberty Bridge.

Bench with a view.

Bench with a view.

For a map of Falls Park, click here.

15 thoughts on “My Town

  1. Gloria Ballard

    We spent a weekend in Greenville a couple of years ago and saw that river, that falls, that bridge. Your photos remind me how beautiful they are and how much we enjoyed that weekend. Thanks for sharing these. And happy post-Mother’s Day!

    Reply
    1. Marian St.Clair Post author

      Michele–I don’t think I could deal with the snow you get, but otherwise Massachesetts is high on my list of favorites. One of my best friends lives in Marlborough!

      Reply
  2. Martha Robinson

    Awe Marian, you are a fine ambassador for lovely Greenville; even though Tim wants nobody else to know how wonderful it is 🙂

    Reply
  3. Marian St.Clair Post author

    Jason–We lived in Columbia for 17 years before moving to Greenville. We still have lots of good friends there but Greenville is a great place to live. We’ve never looked back. Hope you visit here some day and look me up!

    Reply

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