A Crowd of Camellias

For the first time in the four years we have lived in our current home, the nine Japanese camellias (C. japonica) in the garden are all blooming concurrently.  This is likely due to the bitter cold of the past winter, which resulted in a shortened bloom season.  Since all predate me, I know the names of just a few.

Japanese camellias (C. japonica), March 28, 2015

Japanese camellias (C. japonica), March 28, 2015

First (top) row:  ‘Memphis  Belle’ introduced by an American hybridizer in 1968, ‘Glen 40’ registered in 1942, and ‘Jordan’s Pride’ (also known as ‘Herme’ and ‘Brillant Gem’)  introduced from Japan in 1859

Second row:  First 3 unidentified, the one on the right is probably ‘Pink Perfection’, introduced from Japan in 1875

Third row:  Undidentified (the two red splotched are from the same tree)

All the camellias in the first and second rows are planted near the property boundry on the west side of the house (just outside my kitchen window), ‘Memphis Belle’ is the last in that line, so it could have been added after the others.  The house was built in 1952, and some of the camellias are quite large, so I would guess they are at least 40 years old.  They get nearly full sun in winter when the trees are bare and two to three hours of late morning sun in summer.

The two camellias in the third row are planted against the back of the house and are likely to be younger.  Despite getting only an hour or two of sun per day throughout the year, they bloom surprisingly well.

If anyone has a ID for the splotched bloom, I would love to know it’s name.

Male Northern Cardinal, on 'Jordan's Pride' in the February ice storm, waiting for a spot at the bird feeders.

Male Northern Cardinal, on ‘Jordan’s Pride’ in the February ice storm, waiting for a spot at the bird feeders.

 

13 thoughts on “A Crowd of Camellias

  1. Johnnie Ruth sturgeon

    Very nice photos….Louisiana had a shortened bloom season. Magnolia Fiscata is just beginning to bloom. Fragrance is wonderful….Johnnie Ruth

    Sent from my iPad

    >

    Reply
  2. Susan Temple

    Well bother! I have one that was tagged Herme but after seeing your picture and doing some googling, that is not right. It is a solid. I’ve been calling it Herme Henry because it was one of the last plants I bought when working for Henry Busby, Busby Nursery, before he retired. Guess it will now be known as Mystery Henry.

    >>> Hortitopia 4/1/2015 11:09 AM >>>

    Marian St.Clair posted: “For the first time in the four years we have lived in our current home, the nine Japanese camellias (C. japonica) in the garden are all blooming concurrently. This is likely due to the bitter cold of the past winter, which resulted in a shortened bloom s”

    Reply
  3. mattb325

    They are all such lovely blooms! I’m glad the winter didn’t harm the trees…as for the mystery bloom, you could go mad trying to work it out, but it reminds me of C. japonica ‘Ville de Nantes’ which is a fairly old cultivar (about 30 years prior to the house being built) so may fit the rest of the crowd

    Reply
  4. Angie

    You’ve a lovely selection of Camellia Marian – it must be a real treat with them all in bloom. Whether or not you’d ever get an id on the one you don’t know is anyone’s guess, there are so many. Good luck with it

    Reply
    1. Marian St.Clair Post author

      Angie–Yes, I do love the camellias, but in a shady garden you take what you can get. Sadly, there are not nearly as many blooms in summer as I would like.

      Reply
  5. Chloris

    They are all so lovely. I don’ t know the name of your mystery bloom but there are so many different ones, it is difficult to keep up. I love the bird, what a gorgeous photo.

    Reply

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