A River Runs Through It

Inspired by A Tidewater Gardener to capture glimpses of a world beyond my own backyard, I chose Greenville’s Falls Park and Liberty Bridge over the Reedy River for my early morning Winter Walk-Off 2013.

The Reedy River Falls in downtown Greenville are 28-feet tall.

The Reedy River Falls in downtown Greenville are 28-feet tall.

If Greenville is the hub of the Upstate, then Falls Park is the hub of Greenville. The park features breathtaking waterfalls, scenic overlooks, landscaped garden areas, nature trails, a pond, and a spectacular land bridge. Falls Cottage (1838) is located within the park along with a historic grist mill. Plaques provide details related to local history and native plant species.

Bridge-eye view

Bridge-eye view

Reedy River Falls is where Greenville’s first European settler, Richard Pearis, established his trading post in 1768. Pearis later built grist and saw mills at this same location and it continued as the epicenter of industry in Greenville until the 1920s. Although you wouldn’t know it now, Greenville was once touted as The Textile Center of the South, with three mills operating on the Reedy River.

In 1967 Carolina Foothills Garden Club, with the support of Furman University, the City of Greenville, and the Planning Commission, reclaimed 26 acres for the current park. The Club remains a driving force in the park’s development, restoration, and preservation.

Muhlenbergia capillaris (muhly grass)

Muhlenbergia capillaris (muhly grass)

Mary's Restaurant at Falls Cottage

Mary’s Restaurant at Falls Cottage

Liberty Bridge was designed by bridge architect Miquel Rosales of Boston, engineered by Schlaich Bergermann of Stuttgart, Germany, and constructed in 12 months by Taylor and Murphy Construction Co. of Asheville, N.C.

The bridge’s concrete reinforced deck (345 feet long, 12 feet wide and 8 inches thick) is supported by a single suspension cable. The deck’s distinctive curve has a radius of 214 feet and it is cantilevered toward the waterfall from supporting cables on the outside. The bridge deck also inclines 12 feet or 3 percent from east to west over the river.

Liberty Bridge

Liberty Bridge

Rock toss

Rock toss

Today, Falls Park is the location for many public events, from Shakespeare in the Park to Artisphere, and is regarded as a feature attraction of the Upstate.

Garden and grist mill

Garden and grist mill

Catch the wave?

Catch the wave?

Details for this post were taken from Greenville’s website FALLS PARK.

An early morning run in Falls Park

An early morning run in Falls Park

18 thoughts on “A River Runs Through It

  1. Dan Whitten

    Spartanburg is often referred to as the Hub City because of serving as a railroad hub in a mainly textile industry. Strange to hear of Greenville also being referred to as a hub as well.

    Reply
  2. Les

    Thanks for playing along with my walk-off. You were the first this year. I have only been to Greenville once, and that was ages ago, long before that way-cool bridge was there. I lived just outside of Charleston for 3 years and while I was there I took a road trip to see the Upcountry. I remember how different it felt from the coast.

    Reply
    1. Marian St.Clair Post author

      Les–I grew up in Virginia not too far from you but have lived in SC since 1983. Sometimes I still miss “home” but the longer I’m in SC the more I appreciate what a wonderful state it is. Thanks for thinking of the walk-off, it was fun to explore a bit further afield.

      Reply
      1. Jordi

        I am very near Barcelona in Spain, in my region have their own language is Catalan, in the top of my blog there is a tab for the translation, it will be easier to secure and fun

  3. Tee

    Your back yard is our back yard, too! We came to the Greenville area 35 years ago and have watched a lovely city become even more beautiful. I love our park and Main Street.

    Reply
    1. Marian St.Clair Post author

      Janet–I agree! When Tim and I moved to Greenville in 2000 there was a road over the falls instead of the landbridge. Taking out the road completely changed the park. It’s fabulous now and always full of people!

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s